Alzheimer’s treatment with cell cleansing

Strengthening the cleansing system known as mitophagy in brain cells may be an effective method in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Boosting the cleansing system known as mitophagy in brain cells may be an effective method of treating Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. Vilhelm Bohr, from the Center for Healthy Aging and the National Institutes of Health, said: “When the cleansing system does not work properly, there is an accumulation of damaged mitochondria in brain cells, and this can be very dangerous. Failure of the cleansing system at any level to function properly appears to be one of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s in both humans and animals. When we developed this cleaning system in living animals, we found that the signs of Alzheimer’s were almost completely gone.” says.

Researchers closely examined the clearance process in brain cells of deceased Alzheimer’s patients, Alzheimer’s-initiated stem cells, and live mice and roundworms with Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, active substances that affect the cleaning process in animal models were tested.

“The results confirm the notion that the cleansing process is important both in human cells and in different animal species. It is also encouraging that we have been able to make improvements in the area of ​​central Alzheimer’s symptoms, memory and learning in living animals.” says.

Reuse of damaged mitochondria

Mitochondria are inside the cell and act as the cell’s energy factory. Mitophagy breaks down damaged mitochondria and reuses their proteins for different purposes. Researchers have known in previous studies that if mitophagy doesn’t work properly, nerve cells have trouble functioning and surviving, but they were not aware of its association with Alzheimer’s.

It is known that in both Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases, tau and beta amyloid proteins accumulate in the brain and cause cell death. Research in new animal models shows that accelerating mitophagy reduces the accumulation of these proteins.

The researchers say these findings show that it may be possible to treat Alzheimer’s disease by improving the cleansing process, but further investigation and clinical trials in humans are needed.

Source: Future

Boosting the cleansing system known as mitophagy in brain cells may be an effective method of treating Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. Vilhelm Bohr of the Center for Healthy Aging and the National Institutes of Health said: “When the cleansing system does not work properly, damaged mitochondria accumulate in brain cells, and this can be very dangerous. Failure of the cleansing system at any level appears to be one of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s in both humans and animals. When we developed this cleansing system, we found that the symptoms of Alzheimer’s were almost completely gone.” says.

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