Global warming’s sole winner: mosquitoes

 

Increasing air temperatures due to global warming cause mosquitoes to reproduce faster, spread more and be effective throughout the year.

Mosquitoes are one of the most deadly animals in the world. The viruses carried by these animals can cause severe diseases and deaths in other organisms they bite. Millions of people die each year from mosquito-borne malaria, Dengue fever, Zika, chikungunya, yellow fever and at least a dozen more diseases.

But the situation will only get worse. Climate change will make mosquitoes more deadly. As the planet warms, mosquitoes will be more likely to survive the winter. Experts estimate that one billion people will die from mosquito-borne diseases by the end of the century.

Mosquito-borne diseases, which used to spread generally in tropical regions, are now spreading to temperate climates with global warming. Countries in the south such as Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay; In the north, regions such as China, the Middle East, Southern Europe and the USA are at risk.

How does global warming help mosquitoes?

Increasing winter temperatures and warmer winters allow mosquitoes to survive. Rising average temperatures keep mosquitoes active throughout the year and continue to spread diseases. In addition to global warming, increasing carbon dioxide emissions also provide a suitable environment for mosquitoes to breed. Changing winds allow mosquitoes to travel long distances to reach different areas. The increased moisture content also helps these animals reproduce more.

Experts say that immunity is much lower in societies that are not accustomed to viruses spread by mosquitoes, and that large epidemics may occur when these viruses reach new geographies. A similar situation has been seen with the Zika virus. When the virus, whose spread was followed for years, reached Brazil, an epidemic broke out.

Experts say that by stopping global warming, mosquito spread and diseases can be partially prevented. However, this will not end the epidemics in the tropics. Perhaps the developed countries that face this threat can make more efforts to prevent epidemics by experiencing first-hand what happened in Africa.

Clouds are disappearing too

The bad news is not limited to these. Global warming doesn’t just affect mosquitoes. Clouds are one of the components that are affected by global warming and also affect global warming. At any given time today, two-thirds of the Earth is covered with clouds. White clouds reflect the sun’s rays and send them back into space, keeping the Earth from getting too hot. However, the carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere and the resulting increased temperatures reduce cloud formation. The reduction of clouds causes more sunlight to come to Earth. More sunlight is warming the earth even more. In this vicious circle, the clouds are moving towards extinction.

In the simulation they have prepared on this subject, experts say that if not intervened, the white, veil-like clouds called stratocumulus (heap cloud) can completely disappear within 100 years. If that happens, the Earth’s average temperature could suddenly rise by 8 degrees Celsius. This could mean the extinction of many species, both on land and in the sea. Areas close to the equator may become completely uninhabitable. Experts, who determined that there was such a period 56 million years ago, say that we need to take action to avoid a similar experience.

Source: Popular Science, Wired

Increasing air temperatures due to global warming cause mosquitoes to reproduce faster, spread more and be effective throughout the year. Increasing winter temperatures and warmer winters allow mosquitoes to survive. Rising average temperatures keep mosquitoes active throughout the year and continue to spread diseases. In addition to global warming, increasing carbon dioxide emissions also provide a suitable environment for mosquitoes to breed. Changing winds allow mosquitoes to travel long distances to reach different areas. The increased moisture content also helps these animals reproduce more. Experts say that immunity is much lower in societies that are not accustomed to viruses spread by mosquitoes, and that large epidemics may occur when these viruses reach new geographies.

On the other hand, the amount of clouds decreasing due to global warming causes the Earth to warm up more with the sun’s rays. Less clouds are formed in the warmer atmosphere. This vicious circle could cause stratocumulus clouds to disappear in the next 100 years. It is stated that if this happens, the average temperature of the Earth may increase by 8 degrees, and especially the parts close to the equator will become uninhabitable.

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