The eyesight of six visually impaired patients was partially corrected

By removing the eye and optic nerve from the equation, the experts managed to partially correct the vision by transferring video images directly to the visual center.

Thanks to an implant that transmits video images directly to the brain, the vision of six visually impaired individuals was partially corrected.

Alex Shortt, Surgeon at Optegra Eye Hospital in the UK, Daily Mail“This is a very important development,” he told . All previous attempts to develop a bionic eye had attempted to place the implant directly inside the eye. For this to be successful, the patient must have functioning optic nerves. However, this latest development can be considered a real source of hope for those who are completely blind, as it leaves the eye completely out of the equation.” used the phrases.

The validity of the developed technology has not yet been proven on people with congenital visual impairment.

An important advance in neuroscience and neurotechnology

The US team that carried out the research asked the participants, each of whom had been completely blind for years, to look at a computer with a black screen and locate the white squares that randomly appeared in different parts of the monitor. In most of the trials, the participants were able to locate the white squares. Paul Phillip, who has been blind for almost a decade, said: “Even though I could only see tiny dots of light, it’s an incredible feeling.” said.

Neurosurgeon Daniel Yoshor, who led the research, said, “We have a long way to go before we get to where we hope to be. But this development is very exciting for neuroscience and neurotechnology. It seems to me that my lifetime will be enough to see the times when we can fully restore the sight of the blind.” says.

Source: The Guardian

A group of US researchers partially restored the vision of six visually impaired individuals with an implant that transmits video images directly to the brain. The US team that conducted the research asked the participants, each of whom had been completely blind for years, to look at a computer with a black screen and locate the white squares that randomly appeared in different parts of the monitor. In most of the trials, the participants were able to locate the white squares. All previous attempts to develop a bionic eye had attempted to place the implant directly inside the eye. For this to be successful, the patient must have functioning optic nerves. However, this latest development is more promising as it leaves the eye completely out of the equation.

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