Tooth decay may be caused by immune cells

 

It has been discovered that intraoral immune cells called neutrophils can also damage teeth and fillings while fighting bacteria in the teeth.

We owe our lives to our immune system. Without him, even the slightest flu could have been fatal. But the immune system can also make mistakes. These mistakes can cause allergies or diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Researchers from the University of Toronto say cavities may also be caused by “civilian casualties” by an overzealous immune system fighting bacteria.

It was traditionally thought that the cause of tooth decay was bacteria. Bacteria stick to your teeth as a layer of plaque and produce acid as waste. This acid can dissolve tooth enamel, dentin and even filling material.

But the new study reveals that the issue is a little more complex. Intraoral immune cells called neutrophils are sent by the body in response to bacteria in the mouth. But the researchers discovered that neutrophils can be a little sloppy when fighting bacteria. “It’s like hitting a wall with a sledgehammer to kill a fly on the wall,” said Yoav Finer, who led the research. That’s what happens when neutrophils fight bacteria.” says.

Abrades even the filler

Neutrophils alone do not harm teeth, but the problem arises when bacteria demineralize the teeth. On weakened teeth, enzymes secreted by neutrophils smudge other parts of the tooth. It is stated that the damage occurs within hours and, worse, it also affects tooth-colored fillings. This shows why the fillings lose their function in 5-7 years.

“Our study shows that neutrophils can break down resin composites (tooth-colored fillings) and demineralize dentin,” said Russel Gitalis, one of the researchers. This suggests that neutrophils contribute to tooth damage and recurrence of cavities.” says.

The significance of this discovery is that it could help discover new types of treatments or produce new materials to be used as dental fillings.

Source: New Atlas

Researchers from the University of Toronto say cavities may be caused by the ‘civilian casualties’ of an overzealous immune system fighting bacteria. Intraoral immune cells called neutrophils are sent by the body in response to bacteria in the mouth. But the researchers discovered that neutrophils can be a little sloppy when fighting bacteria. “It’s like hitting a wall with a sledgehammer to kill a fly on the wall. That’s what happens when neutrophils fight bacteria,” said Yoav Finer, who led the study. says.

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